Application of Phosphorescence Technology for Toilet Lighting in Refugee Camps

8 Submissions
$35,000 + $10,000 Finalist Prize Pool
Due:  22nd May 2024

Challenge overview

OVERVIEW

The International Rescue Committee (IRC), the Seeker for this technical Wazoku Crowd Challenge, is looking to explore applications for phosphorescent or glow-in-the-dark materials for use as sustainable lighting in toilets in refugee camps.

Chemical engineers, makers, phosphorescent experts, structural designers, WASH advisors, science enthusiasts, luminescent chemists, innovators, and Solvers representing many more innovative skillsets are encouraged to submit a prototype lighting solution.

In order to increase the feeling of safety of women and girls, improve access to facilities, and reduce incidences of violence, Solvers are asked to create prototypes of phosphorescent or equivalent lighting solutions to install or retrofit onto toilet cubicles, for less than US$5 per cubicle.

Phosphorescent materials like strontium aluminate absorb light and release a glow, often for many hours. A light source that is self-charging, functional without technology, and long-lasting would revolutionize lighting in refugee camps – first in latrines with this IRC trial, but with the potential to be used in dwellings, path lighting, and medical facilities in other emergency settings.

Solvers are required to submit solutions detailing their functional, realized prototype, explicit steps to development, and data/videos from a test or demonstration.

This is a Prize Challenge which requires a written proposal and validated proof of prototype (data, pictures, videos) to be submitted. Awards will be contingent upon the theoretical evaluation of the proposal and prototype data, followed by experimental validation of a few, most promising proposals by the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and evaluators.

To receive an Award for this Prize Challenge, Solvers are required to transfer non-exclusive rights to the Intellectual Property (IP) in their proposed solution. Solvers will retain all rights to any proposal not Awarded.

In the first stage of this Challenge, $10,000 USD is reserved to be shared amongst the finalists: the best solution(s) that meet all solution requirements following theoretical evaluation. Then, after shipping the prototype to IRC, an additional $35,000 USD award is contingent on experimental validation of the solution prototype(s) by the IRC and evaluators.

The IRC will make awarded solutions freely available to other non-profit and for-profit organizations to help improve the state of displacement and refugee camps worldwide.

Submissions to this Challenge must be received by 11:59 PM (US Eastern Time) on May 22nd, 2024. Late submissions will not be considered.

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ABOUT THE SEEKER & ELIGIBILITY

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) is a global humanitarian aid, relief, and development nongovernmental organization. Working in more than 40 countries and over 20 U.S. cities, the IRC helps those affected by humanitarian crises to survive, recover, and rebuild their lives.

IRC’s Airbel Impact Lab aims to find and advance breakthrough solutions, delivering them at scale – with an emphasis on solutions that can shape policy and practice around the world and not only in local contexts.   

The IRC is supported in this project by SeaFreight Labs (www.seafreightlabs.com), an open-innovation consultancy using global challenges to cost-effectively deliver breakthrough innovation. Participation in this project is a direct result of SeaFreight Labs membership in the Pledge 1% movement.

The employees of the International Rescue Committee (IRC), as well as their spouses or partners and their relatives up to the fourth degree, are not eligible for awards in this Challenge. 

Follow this link for more information about participation in Wazoku Crowd Challenges.

 

BACKGROUND

The Shining a Light Project reported 40% of women and girls do not use communal or shared latrines that agencies provide in emergency settings, impacting their wellbeing. Women and girls have cited lighting as a blocker to use of latrines: International Rescue Committee (IRC) beneficiaries have repeatedly reported that using a toilet in pitch darkness leaves them vulnerable to gender-based violence. The added difficulty in using a toilet in the dark, necessity of lighting when accompanying young children and when women and girls are managing their menstruation, and the safety aspect of needing to see if there are snakes or vermin in the cubicle means lighting is a hugely varied and important issue.

Unlit cubicles are the norm in refugee camps and emergency settings. In some camps, lighting is enhanced through provision of hand-held lights to households (where resources allow) but this hasn’t substantially addressed the limitation of lighting when using these facilities by women and girls.

With more than 110 million people now living in displacement settings, improvements to latrine lightning in refugee and Internally Displaced People (IDPs) camp settings will enhance the safety of users especially women and girls when accessing these facilities.

In 2023, the IRC launched the Safe and Desirable Female Toilets in Refugee Camps Challenge, to source ideas for increased toilet usage, comfort, and safety among female refugees. Several Solvers suggested the use of phosphorescent materials – glow-in-the-dark objects – to illuminate otherwise dark latrine cubicles and tackle the danger and discomfort felt by users. The IRC would particularly like to thank michvdbent and F. Kreutzer for their awarded contributions to the previous Challenge, and for helping to shape this follow-up Challenge.

During that Challenge, the IRC was made aware of new developments with europium-dosed strontium aluminate granules that glow 10x brighter and 10x longer than previous materials. The IRC is using this follow-up Challenge to explore solutions based on that technology.

Strontium aluminate is a powder compound which, when activated by a suitable dopant (e.g. europium), acts as a light source, emitting a glow through phosphorescence. Typically, when the particles of strontium aluminate within the powder are bigger, the glow emitted is brighter and higher intensity – something for Solvers to consider. With the ease by which this compound is recharged, it is used in many commercial applications, most notably in non-toxic glowsticks and street lighting. Solvers should note that while strontium aluminate is considered chemically inert and non-toxic, care should be used and inhalation can cause irritation. Other phosphorescent materials and dopants are used by Solvers at their own risk.

The strontium aluminate needs to be doped with another material – often europium or dysprosium – for this effect to occur. The combination of strontium aluminate and europium results in the longest-lasting commonly used photoluminescent phosphorescent material.

Phosphorescent materials, when exposed to radiation from light, will glow: absorbing the light and reemitting it at a longer wavelength. Similar lighting methods that make a material glow include luminescence and fluorescence. Luminescence provides a higher level of light than phosphorescence but requires a constant ‘trigger’ to emit light whereas phosphorescent materials can be recharged by length of exposure to light. In fluorescence, materials immediately reemit the light while triggered by a stimulus, but phosphorescent materials reemit for a much longer time even after the initial light source is removed.

Phosphorescence is therefore the main focus in this Challenge. Solutions that provide innovative approaches with luminescent materials for a similar cost (with the same level of rechargeability and ease of use) would be of interest, but fluorescent solutions are less likely to be considered for award.

Solvers are asked to imagine the use of phosphorescent materials as a sustainable, low-technology lighting solution in latrines in refugee camps and emergency settings. These lighting solution prototypes must have a housing structure that is applicable to different kinds of latrines and global contexts, as well as able to be provided for a cost constraint of less than US$5 per latrine.

 

THE CHALLENGE

In this highly technical Challenge, the IRC is looking for Solvers to provide evidence of a functional prototype of a strontium aluminate-based (or comparable phosphorescent or luminescent material) lighting solution that can be placed on the wall or roof of a latrine. This solution should charge itself during the day (absorbing sunlight for a maximum 8 hours) and then glow all night (emitting light for minimum 12 hours), with no batteries, no wires, and no parts to replace. The product should be installable on new facilities during construction or on existing facilities by at most two adults without training and with a minimal set of tools, found in common toolboxes. The installation should be completed with minor renovation work, without compromising the existing structure, and while ensuring full functionality of the product.

Phosphorescent materials, often in powder form, can be accessed and bought for your prototype from common retailers worldwide, including an example here that needs to be charged by light, and then used by IRC team members for personal use. Your submission of a prototype should be an integrated solution: detailing the type of phosphorescent used, its formula/mix, whether it has been doped and by what substance, and also including instructions for how you deployed the material onto/into structural materials and how it could be affixed to latrines in emergency settings.

Solvers should take care to detail and solve for the rechargeability of their strontium aluminate or other phosphorescent material, including innovations in the design or structure of their solution to enable the renewability of their lighting method.

Solvers are asked to provide proof of their prototype: details on its creation, composition, dimensions, weight and steps to develop; photos, data, and videos. Solvers should attach 2 videos to their solution, of maximum 2 minutes each: showcasing your solution at two different times of night, with 10 hours between them. Please timestamp the video or name the files with the times. This video should show the lighting solution’s ability to illuminate a sheet of paper with 14.5 type, making it easily readable.

As part of your prototype, Solvers should consider how to meet the following:

Effective lighting using phosphorescent material

Your solution, method, or technology using strontium aluminate or comparable phosphorescent/luminescent material must provide enough intensity of lighting/illumination for safe usage of a latrine and for the material to provide lighting for at least 12 hours.

Please detail, with as much specificity as possible, the composition of the final phosphorescent product/solution and the different dosages of the components. Many commercial uses of phosphorescent technology combine separate materials and the details of your specific mix is vital to recreate solutions.

The measurement of light emitted by an object can differ according to the contexts of its measurement – comparing measurements taken outside on a bright sunny day compared to a dark, enclosed space, for example. The IRC also understands that not every Solver will have access to precise measuring equipment. Therefore, the IRC and evaluators will judge solutions’ lighting ability and effectiveness primarily through using qualitative measures: solutions must emit a level of light that allows you to read 14.5 font (in black color) in an otherwise dark room. Where possible, Solvers are encouraged to include quantitative measures, including e.g. the lumens produced by their solution.

In order to recharge the phosphorescent solution, it must be exposed to light (often sunlight) that it absorbs and then re-emits. This should take a maximum of 8 hours to fully recharge the phosphorescent material in your solution. This 8 hours is derived from the maximum duration of proper sunshine in the month with the least sunshine in the Tropics, an established measurement used by the IRC when designing photovoltaic systems. If your solution charges to full functionality quicker than 8 hours/this stated requirement, please note in your submission – this would be a more efficient solution and be given extra weight in evaluation. In order to recharge your solution, sunlight used in recharging the system should not be directly introduced inside the toilet. The IRC welcomes innovative solutions that allow for the recharging of the solution, either in situ in the latrine or by removing the phosphorescent material from the housing of the solution, but solutions that directly introduce sunlight into the toilet will not be considered for award.

The ability to provide light from your solution should last at least 5 years (comparable with the optimum performance of traditional phosphorescent materials), including a design that reliably allows for the recharging of the material by sunlight during daylight hours.

The IRC is also aware that phosphorescent materials like strontium aluminate are available in different colors, which affects the color of the light emitted. The IRC proposes no restrictions on the color used, as desirability of the color of the light emitted will be scoped during field tests with camp residents.

Cost constraints

While interested in innovative solutions, to ensure that your ideas can be used in displacement camps around the world, the cost is paramount. Solutions that can be integrated to new and existing latrines that meet lighting specifications should be delivered at a maximum price point of $5 USD per cubicle.

This US$5 reporting cost should be seen as a one-time cost for acquiring phosphorescent materials and constructing your prototype solution, not for its installation or transport. Capital costs and a bill of materials (BOM) are of primary importance in your reporting of the solution cost, but potential labor costs or time for installation are additional areas to consider but not required.

Feasible size and shape of solution

In order to provide functional light in latrines, your solution must be able to be affixed to the different types of latrines worldwide. The average dimensions of a latrine cubicle in the areas IRC assists are: length 1.20-2.00 metres; width 1.05-1.50m; height 2.00 – 2.50m. Your solution’s structure, housing, or dimensions should not exceed these maximum bounds of the latrine, and would ideally be comparable to traditional lighting structures: a bulb, panel, lamp, or other conventional design. The functionality of your solution is important, but so is its acceptability – part of which comes from design, ease of use, and ability to install.

Toilets in displacement camps vary across the world, but they are usually simply constructed, sometimes even from temporary materials or from corrugated metal sheets. The toilets in question are pit latrines or outhouses, free-standing away from dwellings, and they may be individual toilet cubicles or in blocks of up to six. With a minimum standard of one toilet per 20 people, a refugee camp requires thousands of toilets in these configurations.

Your solution should be applicable and affixable to different materials, structures, surface areas, volumes, or other contexts. Please also note that in order to provide maximum acceptable lighting, your solution needs to be placed high up on a latrine wall or from a latrine roof (if applicable) to shine the most light: floor or ground-based solutions will be of little to no interest to evaluators. To get a sense of the structure and design of toilets in a typical context, you can refer to the Sanitation section (beginning p. 33) of this Nigeria guidance document on WASH (Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene).

Installation of solutions should be made as easy as possible, in order to allow for widespread use – the IRC will measure this must-have requirement by the feasibility of installation by 2 adults without specific training equipped with, at most: a ladder and the tools in a standard toolbox (particularly a screwdriver and a hammer).

If you are interested in learning more about international standards around sanitation in camps, the Sphere Handbook is a standard reference.

Sustainability and widespread applicability

The latrines used in emergency settings are usually free-standing, simply constructed, and may be subject to movement or disassembly. Your solution’s structure should be able to be installed and removed by laypersons using simple tools, without compromising, damaging, or destroying either the latrine structure or the solution itself.

Alongside the effective lighting of the phosphorescent material in your solution, its structure or design must also be able to be used without maintenance, as far as possible, for at least 5 years.

Solutions that provide rechargeable, renewable light in latrines may also be of interest in other areas to the IRC. The IRC intends to use prototypes to validate the technical requirements of lighting in emergency settings: follow-up work with operational teams that include the direct experience of users will then help to develop other uses for your phosphorescent technology in other areas.

Robust, weatherproof, waterproof, and theft-resistant

Most of the areas with lighting challenges are in subtropical geographical zones. To account for varying weather and environmental conditions in emergency settings worldwide, the IRC requires your solution to be sturdy and resistant to the elements. Ideal phosphorescent solutions would be irremovable (other than by camp staff) and integrated into latrines’ structures to prevent theft.

Can you or someone you know contribute to solving this Challenge? The IRC encourages you to build a prototype phosphorescent lighting solution or share the Challenge with your network!

 

SOLUTION REQUIREMENTS

Solvers are asked to provide a functional prototype of a phosphorescent lighting solution that could be installed on new latrine facilities during construction or existing facilities with minor renovation work without compromising the existing structure, while ensuring full functionality of the product. Your solution must combine both the phosphorescent material that meets the lighting requirement with a structure/housing for this material. Solutions that solely provide the structure OR the material and its composition will not be considered for award.

The functional prototype of the lighting product should be a working, testable product. The Solver should provide photos and videos of working products with their submission, and the most promising prototypes (as solely determined by evaluators) from the finalists will be asked to ship their mockup to a central IRC location for comparative evaluation, with shipping costs paid by the IRC.

In the first stage of this Challenge, $10,000 USD is reserved to be shared amongst the finalists: the best solution(s) that meet all solution requirements following theoretical evaluation. Then, after shipping the prototype to IRC, an additional $35,000 USD award is contingent on experimental validation of the solution prototype(s) by the IRC and evaluators. The key solution requirements that your prototype and written documentation must meet are around the effectiveness of the lighting, meeting strict cost constraints, and the applicability of your solution to different contexts.

The finalist prize pool is part of Wazoku Crowd’s ongoing efforts to reward more Solvers for their ingenuity, innovation, and interest in this Challenge.

As an example, the best proposals to this Challenge would be evidence of prototype submissions that meet the following criteria:

  • Structure/housing for a phosphorescent material that can be affixed to different latrine types
  • Details of the phosphorescent material: its mix, any doping required, length of time to recharge
  • Charges itself during the day (maximum 8h)
  • Glows all night (minimum 12h) with enough illumination level for safe usage
  • Maximum solution cost of US$5 per cubicle
  • Easily implemented, irremovable, and integrated

The IRC is primarily interested in solutions with the potential to meet the following must-have requirements:

1. Effective lighting solution using phosphorescent material – both in intensity and over time. The IRC are seeking a solution that gives a bright light for at least 12 hours, but the primary evaluation criteria is the brightness of the light emitted at hour 12.

Your solution should emit a level of light/glow that allows you to read 14.5 font in black color in an otherwise dark room, with the following timings: minimum 12 hours of light emitted, followed by a maximum of 8 hours used to recharge the phosphorescent material by exposure to sunlight or other renewable energy method.

This lighting solution should be able to be placed/affixed high up the walls or on the roof of a latrine – the materials of which can differ widely depending on context.

In order to verify your prototype, please attach 2 videos to your solution, of maximum 2 minutes each: showcasing your solution at two different times of night, with 10 hours between them. This video should show the lighting solution’s ability to illuminate a sheet of paper with 14.5 type, making it easily readable.

2. Meets cost constraints – US$5 maximum cost per cubicle, including the cost of the phosphorescent material and its housing.

3. Feasible size and shape of solution

4. Sustainability and applicability

5. Robust, weatherproof, waterproof, and theft-resistant

6. Widespread applicability, flexibility and ease of use

Additionally, the IRC and evaluators will give extra weight to solutions that can complete any of the following nice to have criteria:

  1. Adjustable lighting levels – solutions that provide methods to increase or decrease the light provided by the phosphorescent/equivalent material.

    The IRC does not impose any restrictions on how this is achieved: some ideas may be mechanical, through shutters/filters; chemical, through different proportions of phosphorescent material; or other innovative approaches.

This nice-to-have requirement would ensure the latrines are dark during the day and bright at night. Based on operational standards for certain types of latrines, the interior of latrines is usually kept fairly dim during the day, since flies are attracted by bright light.

There is also the potential for using the solution in other facilities that have no restrictions or no needs for adjustment.

 

Solutions with Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) 4-9 are invited, for proof of concept solutions detailing HOW to achieve this; or production ready collaboration proposals about existing technologies and/or WHO can provide these.

This is a Prize Challenge, which has the following features:
 

  • The best solution(s) in this Prize Challenge have the opportunity to win the award of $35,000 USD for meeting all solution requirements, as solely determined by the IRC and evaluators.
  • In the first stage of this Challenge, $10,000 USD is reserved to be shared amongst the finalists: the best solution(s) that meet all solution requirements following theoretical evaluation. Then, after shipping the prototype to IRC, an additional $35,000 USD award is contingent on experimental validation of the solution prototype(s) by the IRC and evaluators.
  • Solvers are required to submit solutions detailing their functional, realized prototype: with 2 videos required and optional data/photos appreciated.
  • If multiple proposals meet all of the solution requirements, the IRC reserves the right to award only the solution(s) which they believe are most easily implementable.
  • To receive an award for this Prize Challenge, Solvers are required to transfer non-exclusive rights to the Intellectual Property (IP) in their proposed solutions. Solvers will retain all rights to any proposal not Awarded.
  • The IRC will make awarded solutions freely available to other non-profit and for-profit organizations to help improve the state of displacement and refugee camps worldwide.
  • The IRC may also issue “Honorable Mention” recognitions for notable submissions that are not selected for monetary awards.

 

This is a Prize Challenge which requires a written proposal and validated proof of prototype (data, pictures, videos) to be submitted. Awards will be contingent upon the theoretical evaluation of the proposal and prototype data, followed by experimental validation of a few, most promising proposals by the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and evaluators.

To receive an Award for this Prize Challenge, Solvers are required to transfer non-exclusive rights to the Intellectual Property (IP) in their proposed solution. Solvers will retain all rights to any proposal not Awarded.

The IRC will make awarded solutions freely available to other non-profit and for-profit organizations to help improve the state of displacement and refugee camps worldwide.

 

YOUR SUBMISSION

Please complete the submission form. The submitted proposal must be written in English, be between 5-20 pages, and in your submission form response and attachments, you should include:

  1. Participation type – you will first be asked to inform us how you are participating in this challenge, as a Solver (Individual) or Solver (Organization).
  2. Solution Stage - please confirm the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of your proposal: TRL1-3 ideation, TRL4-6 proof of concept, TRL7-9 production ready.
  3. Problem & Opportunity - highlight the innovation in your approach to the Problem, its point of difference, and the specific advantages/benefits this brings (up to 500 words).
  4. Solution Overview - provide an abstract, detailed and specific design, and detailed description of your solution. Please ensure that you describe the features of your proposal and how they address the SOLUTION REQUIREMENTS 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6, including: the composition of the final phosphorescent product/solution, the different dosages, logic, use case, structure of its housing, the steps to implementation, and other details (500 words, there is space to add more in the summary field, and add supporting data, diagrams, etc. as attachments).
  5. Experience - Expertise, use cases and skills you or your organization have in relation to your proposed solution. The IRC may wish to partner at the conclusion of the Challenge; please include a statement describing your expertise and indicating your interest in volunteering towards realizing your prototype solution (up to 500 words).
  6. Solution Risks - any risks you see with your solution and how you would plan for this (up to 500 words).
  7. Timeline, capability and costs - describe what you think is required to deliver the solution, estimated time and cost (per SOLUTION REQUIREMENT 2) – with specific reference to the US$5 cost constraint, including material specifications for all components, material quantities, costs, and a bill of materials (BOM): an attached spreadsheet of costs would be a differentiator (up to 500 words).
  8. References - provide links to any publications or press releases of relevance (up to 500 words).
  9. How did you find this Challenge? – please indicate what drew you to this Challenge, including any relevant advertising or marketing that you followed to this Challenge.
  10. Dimensions and Weight – Please provide the length, width and height of the prototype in centimetres (cm).  Please provide the weight of the prototype in kilograms (kg).
  11. Attachments – please provide 2 videos of the solution, of no more than 2 minutes each, demonstrating its functionality and how it meets the solution requirements. Photos, designs, steps for development, and other attachments are also desired.
  12. Test results, if applicable, that could indicate the progress of the light absorbed and emitted by your solution. Please use a similar reporting structure to the following format:
Location Date RECHARGING
# of hours of light absorption (max 8 hours to full charge)
RECHARGING
% cloud cover on this date
OUTPUT
# of hours of light emitted (min 12 hours)
OUTPUT
If possible, # of lumens (total amount of light)/ lux (light from an area) emitted at hour 0
OUTPUT
If possible, # of lumens (total amount of light)/ lux (light from an area) emitted at hour 6
OUTPUT
If possible, # of lumens (total amount of light)/ lux (light from an area) emitted at hour 12

Wazoku encourages the use by Solvers of AI approaches to help develop their submissions, though any produced solely with generative AI are not of interest.

Do you have any questions or need assistance? Feel free to join us in our Challenge Space! If you're interested in learning more about the Evaluators' requirements for this Challenge, we invite you to participate in our upcoming webinar.

Find out more about participation in Wazoku Crowd Challenges.

Submissions to this Challenge must be received by 11:59 PM (US Eastern Time) on May 22nd, 2024.

Late submissions will not be considered.

Your submission will be evaluated by the evaluation team first reviewing the information and content you have submitted at the submission form, with attachments used as additional context to your form submission. Submissions relying solely on attachments will receive less attention from the evaluation team.

After the Challenge submission due date, the IRC will complete the review process and make a decision with regards to the winning solution(s) according to the timeline in the Challenge header. All Solvers who submit a proposal will be notified about the status of their submissions.

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Macrocompassion Macrocompassion

A better solution would be to use sunlight to charge batteries during the daytime and use the stored electrical energy to provide LED illumination at night.

russell_mcmahon russell_mcmahon

re “ … solutions must emit a level of light that allows you to read 14.5 font (in black color) in an otherwise dark room.” —> 1. A statement of distance BY THE SOLVER at which this demonstration is made should be part of the requirement. While this may be able to be determined from the video this may be visually misleading.2. A statement of indicative desired measurement distance BY THE SEEKER could be useful.3. (a) A statement by the Seeker of illumination level in lumens per watt (lux) corresponding to the desired level would be useful. (b) A statement by the solver of achieved illumination levels would be useful to the seeker.While not all solvers will be able to provide this it would be valuable for those who can. Apparent brightness in a video recording can vary very substantially - having absolute measurements where available would help.

Henry Crabtree (EN) Henry Crabtree (EN)

@russell_mcmahon Hi @Laura R. Cortés, would you be able to assist me in passing on this note to the IRC evaluators for this Challenge? Thank you! Then, once you receive a response from Bansaga, could you reply to Russell here?Thanks for the note Russell!

Laura R. Cortés Laura R. Cortés

@russell_mcmahon Hi Russell, I have already shared your question with the Challenge Seeker, I will let you know when I receive his answer.

russell_mcmahon russell_mcmahon

I think (or rereading :-( )my point 3 is more or less covered (but important). I think that the other two are important.I have substantial experience taking photos of LED & other lighting to demonstrate illumination levels. It usually takes some effort to produce an image which gives an honest impression of light levels as perceived by the eye. It is very easy to produce images which appear brighter than they really are - either accidentally or purposefully.Interest only - here is a comparison between a kerosene lantern turned well up and my 2007 prototype Innocentive BOGO light. Some “playing” was required with camera settings to produce a photo that rendered the scene close to what the eye saw.

Henry Crabtree (EN) Henry Crabtree (EN)

@russell_mcmahon That really is fascinating, and certainly something I’ll raise with them - I believe their intention around reading a certain size of font in a certain font colour was to make it universal between submissions (hoping to remove this contextual lighting point!) and also open up submissions to those who may not have the methods, knowledge, or tooling required to submit lux data.I completely understand if you want to raise this point in your submission, alongside your indicative photographs, and over-providing beyond the solution requirement to evaluators.Thanks again Russell!

russell_mcmahon russell_mcmahon

Final (probably :-) ) comment.I don’t need an answer for my sake. IRC are of course welcome to action what I say not as best suits their requirement.

DP Dennis Pow

This seems to be an incredibly hard requirement to meet.Initial brightness can be good but meeting the brightness levels over many hours is challenging. Hopefully someone will manage.QUESTION ~~ If no solutions using phosphoresence technology meet the requirement, would the use of another technology that does meet the requirement and which meets the overall requirements in spirit be potentially acceptable. This is not asking for a guarantee but that other suitable solutions may be considered.